onderwerp

From data to models to decisions: hydroinformatics for urban water management

Hydroinformatics for water wise(r) cities

Hydroinformatics provide the means to turn data into knowledge and then into informed decisions, directly supporting integrated urban water management. Combining information technology and water research, KWR uses hydroinformatics to support decision-making for more resilient and more integrated urban water management.

Hydroinformatics facilitates integration

To keep up with rapid scientific and social developments, the water sector must be able to react in a resilient and efficient manner. More and more often, water companies and waterboards are using hydroinformatics to turn data into knowledge and then into informed decisions, directly supporting integrated urban water management. Hydroinformatics forms a link between information technology and water research and technology. Fragmented knowledge and data are brought together and translated into integrated water models and tools, giving rise to more water-wise ideas, plans and concepts.

Research for the urban water chain

KWR uses hydroinformatics to support decision-making for more resilient and more integrated urban water management. We bring knowledge development to a higher level by extracting information out of data and knowledge out of information. This helps the water sector face complex challenges and to translate decisions into practical actions.

 

  • Value extraction from data

Setting up test locations for the development of techniques and methods, building on large-scale data-related projects.

The main research areas are: big data, open access, data security, data interoperability and standards; smart meters, smart sensors and smart services, remote sensing, use of earth observation systems – satellite products, data keeping/warehousing, data mining, synergy with ‘non’-water data.

 

  • Knowledge encapsulation into models and tools

Developing tools that can help understand, analyse and manage the complexity of the social-technical aspects of the water system both at the process and city levels.

Examples include: data-driven models, optimisation algorithms, advanced time series analysis, standardisation (including OpenMI), user-friendliness and benchmarking.

 

  • ICT-supported knowledge transfer

Development of new forms of communication, supported by information technology, focused on the transfer of knowledge and information to water companies, policy-makers and households.

Examples include: serious games, smart apps, scenario platforms, support of ‘smart’ homes and ‘smart’ cities.

 

  • Integrated water-wise concept development

Development of new, integrated water-wise concepts for the urban water system, including research into urban water system resilience.

Examples include: looking at the centralised versus the decentralised watercycle, investigating the effects on system performance of modular water facilities and sanitation, developing scenario-based stress-strain diagrams for water system resilience profiling.

Powerful tools for decision-making

Its interdisciplinary nature makes hydroinformatics a powerful tool for integrated urban water management. Due to the combination of technological, social and environmental interests it offers water companies and waterboards access to better knowledge directly supporting decision-making. Information technology allows us to translate data and models into practical actions for the water sector.